Recordings of the classes listed below are all available on-demand in our Learning Library for LYRASIS Learning subscribers. This page is updated when new recordings are added to the Learning Library. Contact es@lyrasis.org with questions about logging in or subscribing to LYRASIS Learning.

  • A Bakers Dozen of Cyber Secure Tips
    • Contributers: Blake Carver
    • Description: Spend an hour learning the most important things you can do to help make your online life more private and secure. In this 1 hour session, learn 13 tips on keeping your technology safe with Blake Carver, LYRASIS Systems Administrator.

  • A Deeper Dive into Open Educational Resources: Myths, Barriers, and Current Issues
    • Contributers: Sarah Hare, Sarah Hare
    • Description: Open Educational Resources (OER), or learning objects that are explicitly licensed so that others can retain, reuse, and revise them, continue to gain traction in higher education, both as a potential solution to the rising cost of textbooks and as an impetus for improving pedagogy. As a result, several libraries have established incentive programs and outreach to raise instructor awareness of OER and increase OER adoption and creation on their campuses. In order to lead these programs, librarians must intentionally prepare for instructor misconceptions, gaps in knowledge, and questions. Building upon Lyrasis’ introductory course on OER offered in August 2019, this course will provide participants with an overview of common myths related to OER, including concerns about peer review and comprehensiveness, as well as barriers instructors face when adopting OER, including a lack of familiarity with Creative Commons and the need for ancillary materials. Potential solutions and talking points will be discussed. The session will conclude with a short overview of current issues that librarians working with OER should be familiar with. While some background on OER will be covered, this session is intended for librarians that already have a working knowledge of how OER are defined and why they are important.

  • A Look Inside the New ArchivesSpace Technology and Development Roadmap
    • Contributers: Christine Di Bella
    • Description: The ArchivesSpace Technology & Development Roadmap is a planning and communication tool to help our community know what to expect in terms of future development work and aid in planning for upcoming releases. Distributed at the end of 2017, the latest version of our roadmap has many content and format updates, and now provides a series of views targeted at the needs of different kinds of ArchivesSpace stakeholders. The roadmap announcement can be found here: http://archivesspace.org/roadmap/. In this webinar, Program Manager Christine Di Bella walks through the new roadmap format and also take questions and comments on the development planning process.

  • Accessibility for All: Training Librarians and Auditing Materials for Accessibility Issues
    • Contributers: Sam Harlow, Sam Harlow
    • Description: In this webinar, a public service Online Learning Librarian from a mid-sized, public university will present on training librarians on creating and purchasing accessible material, as well as tips and tricks for auditing e-resources for accessibility issues.

  • Advanced Digital Stewardship
    • Contributers: Leigh Grinstead
    • Description: A step-by-step approach to tackling digital preservation. We will begin with an overview of best practices for creating preservation-worthy digital content. Participants will then learn how to do an assessment of their own institutional organization and material, and begin development of an institutional preservation policy. Lastly, we will review the PREMIS metadata model with an eye towards developing collection-level metadata.

  • Advanced Preservation Metadata: How to Make it Happen
    • Contributers: Rebecca Guenther
    • Description: This class builds on Introduction to Preservation Metadata by providing a walk-through of the PREMIS Data Dictionary. It reviews the information that is considered necessary within that standard to preserve digital assets and how they are recorded and used. It considers a range of implementation options and explores how different institutions have used the PREMIS semantic units in preservation systems.

  • All History is Local: Find, Preserve, and Digitize Collections that Tell the Story
    • Contributers: Annie Peterson
    • Description: Every community has its own history and related resources to preserve for future generations. This class will explore different approaches to collecting items to document a community and how to build up collections of local history. The class will cover basic preservation of archival collections, and creating wider access to local history collections through digitization.

  • An Introduction to Library Simplified and SimplyE
    • Contributers: Carissa Egan
    • Description: In the fall of 2017, LYRASIS and the Digital Public Library of America announced a partnership to pilot a new eContent delivery and management service for libraries leveraging the New York Public Library-developed Library Simplified open source software and the associated SimplyE mobile application technology. This session is designed to provide an introduction to both technologies and demonstrate how libraries can merge content from multiple sources, add open content, manage and curate collections, and provide patrons with seamless access to eContent through one app.

  • Annual Member Forum 2018: Designing Instruction, Marketing and Assessment Programs for ArchivesSpace
    • Contributers: Christine Kim, Eleanor Blackman
    • Description: ArchivesSpace held its fourth annual Member Forum on August 14, 2018 in Washington, DC. Just as in previous years, this was a free opportunity for staff from ArchivesSpace member institutions to meet and share information with each other and the program team about all things ArchivesSpace. This is a recording of a presentation from the Annual Member Forum on August 14, 2018. Special thanks to Atlas Systems for recording this footage.

  • Applying Cultural Intelligence in Libraries and Next Steps: Part 3 of the Cultural Intelligence Series
    • Contributers: Michele Villagran, Dr. Michele A. L. Villagran
    • Description: Cultural intelligence is the capability to function effectively across various cultural contexts (Ang & Van Dyne, 2008). It can be integrated with other forms of intelligence and applies to any cultural context (i.e., diversity initiatives, organizational culture, generational culture, gender culture, etc.). Within Part 2: “Cultural Intelligence: What it is and Why it Matters” participants learned about the cultural intelligence model. This class builds upon that session in further examining how we can apply cultural intelligence within our libraries and begin to see it in action. Participants will have the opportunity to create their own development plan based on their own assessment and begin developing action steps toward improving their own cultural intelligence.

  • Archival Appraisal for the Non-Archivist
    • Contributers: Leigh Grinstead, Annie Peterson
    • Description: Using a series of case studies the class will examine how to appraise both physical and digital archival materials and will give practical guidance that can be applied in any setting. By the end of the class students will be able to understand and define the differences between records, collections, and series and to be able to assess the provenance in order to make a determination about when it is important, and when it is not.

  • Archives Preservation
    • Contributers: Annie Peterson
    • Description: Archival collections typically include a range of different formats that each have their own preservation challenges. This class will cover preservation from a broad perspective, discussing planning, policies, and procedures down to an item-level perspective, discussing modes of deterioration and how to protect items for long-term access. This class focuses on preserving physical collections, but digital preservation is introduced briefly. The class is presented in three two-hour sessions.

  • ArchivesDirect Overview: Standards-Based Preservation with Hosted Archivematica
    • Contributers: Heather Greer Klein, Heather Greer Klein & Kelly Stewart, Kelly Stewart
    • Description: This webinar will provide an overview of ArchivesDirect, a hosted Archivematica service that includes DuraCloud preservation storage and is provided by LYRASIS in partnership with Artefactual Systems. We’ll cover what hosted Archivematica can do for your organization; how it integrates with other systems and services; and the training and support provided with an ArchivesDirect subscription.

  • ArchivesSpace Annual Member Forum 2018: Ah! ASnake! What do I do?
    • Contributers: Christine Kim, David Mayo
    • Description: ArchivesSpace held its fourth annual Member Forum on August 14, 2018 in Washington, DC. Just as in previous years, this was a free opportunity for staff from ArchivesSpace member institutions to meet and share information with each other and the program team about all things ArchivesSpace. This is a recording of a presentation from the Annual Member Forum on August 14, 2018. Special thanks to Atlas Systems for recording this footage.

  • ArchivesSpace Annual Member Forum 2018: Copying Digital Objects from CONTENTdm into ArchivesSpace
    • Contributers: Christine Kim, Seth Shaw
    • Description: ArchivesSpace held its fourth annual Member Forum on August 14, 2018 in Washington, DC. Just as in previous years, this was a free opportunity for staff from ArchivesSpace member institutions to meet and share information with each other and the program team about all things ArchivesSpace. This is a recording of a presentation from the Annual Member Forum on August 14, 2018. Special thanks to Atlas Systems for recording this footage.

  • ArchivesSpace Annual Member Forum 2018: Creating Subjects FASTer
    • Contributers: Christine Kim, Rachel Maderik
    • Description: ArchivesSpace held its fourth annual Member Forum on August 14, 2018 in Washington, DC. Just as in previous years, this was a free opportunity for staff from ArchivesSpace member institutions to meet and share information with each other and the program team about all things ArchivesSpace. This is a recording of a presentation from the Annual Member Forum on August 14, 2018. Special thanks to Atlas Systems for recording this footage.

  • ArchivesSpace Annual Member Forum 2018: Integrating with Discovery Layers
    • Contributers: Christine Kim, Benn Joseph, Sarah Ponichtera, Kevin Clair
    • Description: ArchivesSpace held its fourth annual Member Forum on August 14, 2018 in Washington, DC. Just as in previous years, this was a free opportunity for staff from ArchivesSpace member institutions to meet and share information with each other and the program team about all things ArchivesSpace. This is a recording of a presentation from the Annual Member Forum on August 14, 2018. Special thanks to Atlas Systems for recording this footage.

  • ArchivesSpace Annual Member Forum 2018: Legacy Migrations into ArchivesSpace
    • Contributers: Christine Kim, Bria Parker, John Rees, Celia Caust-Ellenbogen
    • Description: ArchivesSpace held its fourth annual Member Forum on August 14, 2018 in Washington, DC. Just as in previous years, this was a free opportunity for staff from ArchivesSpace member institutions to meet and share information with each other and the program team about all things ArchivesSpace. This is a recording of a presentation from the Annual Member Forum on August 14, 2018. Special thanks to Atlas Systems for recording this footage.

  • ArchivesSpace Annual Member Forum 2018: Library-style Authority Control in ArchivesSpace
    • Contributers: Christine Kim, Kevin Schlottmann
    • Description: ArchivesSpace held its fourth annual Member Forum on August 14, 2018 in Washington, DC. Just as in previous years, this was a free opportunity for staff from ArchivesSpace member institutions to meet and share information with each other and the program team about all things ArchivesSpace. This is a recording of a presentation from the Annual Member Forum on August 14, 2018. Special thanks to Atlas Systems for recording this footage.

  • ArchivesSpace Annual Member Forum 2018: Roundtable for Very Small or Small Members
    • Contributers: Christine Kim, Nick Zmijewski, Taylor McNeilly
    • Description: ArchivesSpace held its fourth annual Member Forum on August 14, 2018 in Washington, DC. Just as in previous years, this was a free opportunity for staff from ArchivesSpace member institutions to meet and share information with each other and the program team about all things ArchivesSpace. This is a recording of a presentation from the Annual Member Forum on August 14, 2018. Special thanks to Atlas Systems for recording this footage.

  • ArchivesSpace Annual Member Forum 2018: Using Drupal for the PUI: the ArchivesSpace/Drupal 8 Integration Project
    • Contributers: Christine Kim, Seth Shaw
    • Description: ArchivesSpace held its fourth annual Member Forum on August 14, 2018 in Washington, DC. Just as in previous years, this was a free opportunity for staff from ArchivesSpace member institutions to meet and share information with each other and the program team about all things ArchivesSpace. This is a recording of a presentation from the Annual Member Forum on August 14, 2018. Special thanks to Atlas Systems for recording this footage.

  • ArchivesSpace Assessment Module: Overview and Implementation
    • Contributers: Christine Kim, Dan Santamaria; Adrienne Pruitt; Christie Peterson
    • Description: The ArchivesSpace Assessments Module made a quiet debut in October 2017 with the v2.2.0 release. In this webinar, Dan Santamaria (Director of Digital Collections and Archives, Tufts University) provides insight into the role assessment plays within the wider picture of collection management, and why the institution was compelled to fund its development. Adrienne Pruitt (Collections Management Archivist, Tufts University) discusses the development process, runs through a demo of the module, and talks about how it’s helping with a collection-wide survey at Tufts. Christie Peterson (Head of Technical Services for Special Collections, Smith College) shares how Smith College will use the assessments module in the coming year, and her experience with various manifestations of managing assessments.

  • ArchivesSpace Implementation Buddies: Buddying up with Budding Users
    • Contributers: Christine Kim
    • Description: In this webinar, ArchivesSpace Community Engagement Coordinator Christine Kim shares a closer look at the Implementation Buddy listing as well as the ArchivesSpace Member Directory.

  • ArchivesSpace Overview: Features of the Application
    • Contributers: Christine Kim
    • Description: This overview highlights the variety of ArchivesSpace features and modules designed to support core functions in archives administration such as accessioning; description and arrangement of processed materials including analog, hybrid, and born-digital content; management of authorities (agents and subjects) and rights; and reference service. The application also supports collection management through collection management records, tracking of events, container and location management, and an assessments module that can be used to manage your physical and digital collection material.

  • ArchivesSpace Staff Interface Demo: Managing and Describing Records
    • Contributers: Christine Kim
    • Description: This demo focuses on how archivists may use ArchivesSpace to describe physical and digital collection material.

  • ArchivesSpace Staff Interface Demo: Managing the Application
    • Contributers: Christine Kim
    • Description: This demo of the ArchivesSpace staff interface highlights the major command zones used to manage the application and set global, repository, and user preferences.

  • ArchivesSpace v2.2.2 Public User Interface Demo
    • Contributers: Christine Kim
    • Description: Demonstration of the ArchivesSpace Public User Interface -- a platform dedicated to searching, browsing, and discovering archival collection material.

  • Audiovisual Digitization Basics
    • Contributers: Annie Peterson
    • Description: This class will enable students to create an outline of a digital project management plan for audio visual collections and understand the resources available for next steps. This class will cover the differences in Machine-based AV Collections, review the history of recording devices, and acknowledge preservation issues. Students leaving the class will have a solid understanding of digital audio and video files, modes of capture, best practice for digital audio and video, quality control procedures, storage and preservation issues.

  • Audiovisual Preservation
    • Contributers: Annie Peterson
    • Description: Audiovisual materials come in many formats and can be found throughout our collections. They may be audio recordings of oral histories on reel to reel tape, VHS cassettes with sound and images from campus plays, or a video tape from your local public television station for which you never had a play back machine. Regardless of format, what all analog audiovisual media have in common is that they are depend on format specific players and they are aging. The United States’ National Recording Preservation Plan Sound Study published in late 2012 stated that “many analog audio recordings must be digitized within the next 15 to 20 years—before sound carrier degradation and the challenges of acquiring and maintaining playback equipment make the success of these efforts too expensive or unattainable.” This class is not about digitization of audiovisual materials, but about care and handling concerns of the physical media. Care that allows for institutions to make strategic decisions to allocate resources and to get ready for a digitization program down the line.

  • Be an Engaging Webinar Leader: Create and Deliver Better Virtual Presentations
    • Contributers: Steven Bell, Steven Bell
    • Description: Does it seem your inbox is bursting with announcements for webinars? With face-to-face conferencing ground to a halt during social distancing, professional development has transitioned to an almost entirely virtual experience. Unfortunately, it’s often an underwhelming and disappointing one. Monotone speakers. Loads of bullet point slides—and presenters who just read them—or notes that are drier than dust. Effective in-person teaching and presenting skills are not automatically transferable to the virtual space as evidenced in many webinars.

  • Beyond Affordable Learning: How to Improve Access and Equity with Open Educational Resources (while also Saving Students Money)
    • Contributers: Matthew Bloom, Matthew Bloom
    • Description: Over the last decade, the awareness and use of open educational resources (OER) has seen significant expansion as educators and institutions increasingly avail themselves of educational materials that are either free from copyright (i.e. in the public domain) or are available for free use and adaptation under an open sharing license (e.g. those developed by Creative Commons). The word “free,” however, does not accurately describe the materials that these individuals and organizations are using, because “open” materials explicitly permit use and adaptation in ways that much freely-accessible content doesn’t. This course covers the basics of open content licensing and explores a variety of existing OER initiatives to help identify a set of best practices that may be scaled across institutions.

  • Bias and Culture Matters: Part 1 of the Cultural Intelligence Series
    • Contributers: Michele Villagran, Dr. Michele A. L. Villagran
    • Description: Those of us who work in libraries encounter differing cultures regularly, as our world is very diverse. Both internally with colleagues and staff, and externally with the patrons which we serve, culture matters. Culture matters in attracting and retaining library and information professionals and for developing inclusive work environments. We need to develop an understanding of cultural identities and their impact on thinking and behavior at both the individual and team level. Understanding biases and enhancing our own cultural awareness are the critical first steps in creating diverse, inclusive, and equitable organizations.

  • BibFrame and the Future of MARC Cataloging: An Introduction
    • Contributers: Mary Bolin, Mary Bolin
    • Description: This 90-minute session will introduce the Library of Congress’s BibFrame project, the “bibliographic framework” that is intended to replace MARC format as a way to encode cataloging information. It will introduce the concept, characteristics, and features of BibFrame, explain its relationship to current standards and practices, and discuss the possible timeline and process for implementation by bibliographic utilities, Integrated Library Systems, and libraries.

  • Building a Data Savvy Community with Library Carpentry
    • Contributers: Jennifer Bielewski, Christopher Erdmann
    • Description: Library Carpentry workshops teach information professionals digital curation, workflow automation, and data savvy skills and approaches. An important aim of Library Carpentry and The Carpentries is to help libraries prepare for an increasingly data-driven future.

  • Care and Preservation of Oversized, Paper-based Collections
    • Contributers: Annie Peterson
    • Description: Architectural drawings, large maps, huge works of art on paper, and other large items can be fascinating items in collections but also cause challenges with long-term preservation. How can these items be stored, transported, used by researchers, and digitized with their long-term preservation in mind? This class will review identification of some common reproduction methods for large items; care, handling, and storage of oversized flat paper and bound volumes; digitizing oversized items; and basics of disaster preparedness activities specific to large items. Attendees will learn how to better care for oversized collections in their cultural heritage institution.

  • Caring for Originals during Digitization Projects
    • Contributers: Annie Peterson
    • Description: Are you planning a digitization project at your institution? Have you considered the implications of such a project on the physical materials that you will be digitizing? It is important that strategies for preserving originals be included in planning digitization projects. This class explores the ways digitization provides an opportunity to stabilize, re-house and repair materials being digitized. We will discuss care and handling techniques to ensure that the original objects are not damaged during the digitization process. The class also will discuss selecting equipment and setting up spaces for digitization with the physical preservation of originals in mind.

  • Caring for Scrapbooks: Preservation and Digitization Today
    • Contributers: Leigh Grinstead
    • Description: For many institutions, scrapbooks are one of the most problematic formats in their collections. Common in the 19th and early 20th century, scrapbooks are a unique record of individuals, families, or organizations. Newspaper and magazine clippings, cards, other ephemera, and photographs were adhered to poor quality paper in improper bindings, making them a special challenge. This live online class will examine the materials and techniques used to create scrapbooks, outline quality storage materials and proper handling techniques for these special materials. We will also take a look at some digitization options and techniques for access in use today. While the focus is on older scrapbook collections, many of the same issues apply to scrapbooks being created today.

  • Catalyst Fund Webinar Series: Access to US Congressional Correspondence Data
    • Contributers: Danielle Emerling, Danielle Emerling
    • Description: Constituent correspondence with the U.S. Congress captures the interactions between Americans and their elected representatives. Congress manages correspondence with proprietary systems, and data exported from these systems is donated to libraries across the country. The complexity, format, and sensitive nature of the exported data have posed challenges for repositories. No repository has processed these large data sets in a replicable way, and without a concerted effort, data is at risk of disappearing. The America Contacts Congress project, funded by a LYRASIS Catalyst Fund grant, provides a roadmap for preserving and providing access to this unique resource.

  • Catalyst Fund Webinar Series: Applying Machine Learning on Digital Library Images
    • Contributers: Harish Maringanti, Harish Maringanti, Dhanushka Samarakoon, Bohan Zhu
    • Description: Metadata is the bedrock of Digital Library systems, as it helps in users discovering the unique content in various collections housed in digital libraries. But creating metadata is a time-intensive process. At J. Willard Marriott Library, University of Utah, we experimented with machine learning algorithms to generate descriptive metadata for digital images, thanks to funding from Lyrasis. In this webinar, we will share the results of our work, and also lessons learned from working with digital library data and machine learning algorithms

  • Catalyst Fund Webinar Series: Data-Intensive Tools for Modeling and Visualizing Mass Reading
    • Contributers: John Shanahan, John Shanahan, Robin Burke, Ana Lucic
    • Description: An overview of the “Reading Chicago Reading” project and introduction of its prototype interactive visualization dashboard for data associated with the “One Book One Chicago” (OBOC) program of the Chicago Public Library (CPL). We will show an easy-to-use interactive tool to visualize circulation and other book data, to be used by librarians, academic researchers, city officials, and interested members of the public. We will discuss our use of four sources of data: (1) demographic data, such as census data and other aggregated information about city residents and patrons, (2) an archive of Chicago Public Library outreach events, (3) anonymized CPL book circulation transactions, and (4) full-text book content available through the HathiTrust Digital Library

  • Catalyst Fund Webinar Series: Digital Collecting in Times of Crisis
    • Contributers: Kara McClurken, Kara McClurken
    • Description: The University of Virginia Library applied for a 2018 Catalyst Fund grant to help cultural institutions and communities of all sizes be better prepared for and able to implement digital collecting strategies during and after rapidly evolving emergencies and/or community crises (such as controversies, natural disasters and public emergencies). Digital photos, videos, and social media content are major components of these community experiences, and collecting them as well as other materials (posters, ephemera, traditional media reports, etc.) is important to documenting such pivotal events. While some tools exist that can help a library or archives gather information, a range of technical, legal, and infrastructure issues are involved that hamper the ability of an organization to move forward quickly

  • Catalyst Fund Webinar Series: Online Instruction for Participatory Archiving
    • Contributers: Carolyn Goldstein, Carolyn Goldstein
    • Description: In 2019, with support from the LYRASIS Catalyst Fund, a team of archivists and public historians at UMass Boston developed an informational video and set of instructional materials to empower libraries of all kinds to partner effectively with community groups to organize day-long digitizing events to collect photographs, stories, and memories and document the cultural heritage of their communities. The materials are based on the Mass. Memories Road Show model and available online at blogs.umb.edu/massmemories. This webinar will introduce participants to these materials and highlight how they can be used by libraries, archives, museums, and cultural institutions to organize similar events and partner with local communities to build collections on their own

  • Catalyst Fund Webinar Series: Quantitative Research Institute for Libraries
    • Contributers: Cathryn Miller, Cathryn Miller, Marcia Rapchak, Sara Baron, Marcia Rapchak
    • Description: This webinar will provide an overview of a LYRASIS Catalyst grant winner for a Quantitative Institute for Libraries (QUIL), which was held in Pittsburgh, PA in May of 2019. We will describe our inspiration for the Institute, how we planned and organized for the event, what challenges we faced, and what content we covered. We will also discuss attendee feedback and ideas for future iterations of QUIL

  • Catalyst Fund: The Application Process and Overview Webinar
    • Contributers: Leigh Grinstead, Leigh Grinstead
    • Description: What is the Catalyst Fund and how to apply? What are we looking for and the deadlines and process for review? If you are interested in learning more, this is your chance to ask questions of the program staff and learn the inside scoop. Register today!

  • CEO Interview with Loretta Parham
    • Contributers: Robert Miller
    • Description: LYRASIS CEO sits down with Loretta Parham, CEO and Director of the Atlanta University Center (AUC), a longtime LYRASIS member. She discusses some of the milestones and challenges she has seen during her career, and shares her perspective on how we as information professionals can impact the communities around us, both with services and with our unique and valuable content. This interview is part of the series "Interview with the CEO," which is designed to highlight some of the heroes in the world of Galleries, Libraries, Archives, and Museums, as well as their thoughts on the role of our community in fostering innovation and delivering content and knowledge to the world.

  • Change in VUCA Times: From Change Management to Change Readiness
    • Contributers: Steven Bell, Steven Bell
    • Description: Librarians from all sectors in the profession know about change management. There is a plethora of literature and conference presentations devoted to advice on how libraries can better achieve change by applying one of multiple management models. While a well-thought out change management process can alleviate some of the pain points staff experience, this workshop communicates another approach that puts the focus on readiness rather than management.

  • Chart the Future: Becoming a Co-Conspirator
    • Contributers: Felton Thomas, Felton Thomas
    • Description: LYRASIS Member Summit 2019 keynote speaker Felton Thomas Jr., Executive Director, CEO of Cleveland Public Library.

  • Choosing an ILS that Meets Your Needs
    • Contributers: Timothy Dickey, Timothy J. Dickey
    • Description: Library Technology is not new, but the world of our tools is changing with astonishing speed. Every library and information center will face moments when our basic operations, and the meeting of our users’ needs, demands a re-assessment of our basic technology. Rather than just being a moment of fear, the process of selecting and acquiring new technology can instead be a time of growth and learning about our own institution, and about our users.

  • Collecting Social Media
    • Contributers: Jessica Venlet, Jessica Venlet
    • Description: In this webinar participants will learn about various aspects of starting a social media archiving project or program. We will explore community resources and discuss a variety of topics like technology and types of social media archiving, collection development and policy considerations, and description. The instructor will cover specific tools such as Archive-It, twarc, and webrecorder. Some prior knowledge of web archiving may be helpful, but is not required.

  • Community Collections Spotlight - Exploring CollectionSpace on Campus at the University of California, Berkeley
    • Contributers: Richard Millet, Chris Hoffman, Rick Jaffe
    • Description: The upcoming webinar will feature speakers discussing the myriad ways CollectionSpace is used at the museums at the University of California, Berkeley. The speakers will talk about the common needs and benefits that brought the museums together, the way the campus governance council has facilitated the process and the new enhancements that Berkeley team has created and contributed back to the benefit the larger CollectionSpace community.

  • Community Collections Spotlight - Webinar 1 - Exploring the Public Art Archive
    • Contributers: Lori Goldstein, Lori Goldstein
    • Description: The upcoming webinar will feature CollectionSpace’s Public Art Profile, a collection management system built specifically for the public art field, developed in partnership with the Public Art Archive (PAA). PAA is a project sponsored by WESTAF (the Western States Arts Federation), dedicated to providing technology tools and resources to the public art field. As of early 2019, PAA deployed the collection management system to eight programs across the US who are using the system to manage their publicly funded art collections from the commissioning the conservation processes. The first installment of this webinar will feature the collection management tool and its utilization of the CollectionSpace architecture to build a workflow suited specifically for the management of public art. This webinar is part of the “Community Collections Spotlight” series.

  • Community Collections Spotlight - Webinar 2 - Exploring the Public Art Archive
    • Contributers: Lori Goldstein, Lori Goldstein
    • Description: As a follow-up to the first webinar in the series, a second presentation will highlight how system users are able to publish objects in their databases to the publicly searchable Public Art Archive, an online and mobile database of public art. The Public Art Archive utilizes the Public Art Profile collection management system to aggregate data throughout the world for the purpose of making information, locations, and images searchable on the Archive’s website. To accomplish this, the Public Art Archive team has harnessed the potential of the CollectionSpace architecture to present the data in ways that provide sustainable engagement for artists, public art collections, the educators, and the general public. This webinar is part of the “Community Collections Spotlight” series.

  • Community Recovery Through Arts and Culture
    • Contributers: Mary Eileen Fouratt, Amy Schwartzman
    • Description: Arts and culture—through the artists and arts and cultural organizations that bring them to communities -- have a vital role to play in recovery from disasters. Whether joining people through music, dance, theater or other experiences; providing moments of respite, joy and humor; allowing people to tell their personal stories of the disaster through visual, verbal or other means; or even just providing a place to congregate, gather information or grab a cup of coffee, arts and culture and the organizations that produce them enable us to move from victimhood to personhood, even if only for a moment, and help us rebuild the social infrastructure of our individual and community lives. In this webinar, we will focus on how you, as performing arts organizations, can engage in this work. We will provide background in basic disaster management principles, share work other organizations have produced, give guiding principles as well as a brief how-to, leave you with resources for further study, and answer any questions you may have. Rebuilding social infrastructure strengthens communities’ abilities to move forward after disasters. Learn how to be part of the process and gain a seat at the table in your community’s recovery.

  • Copyright for Digital Collections: Evaluating your Collections to Create and Implement Rights Statements
    • Contributers: Leigh Grinstead, Leigh Grinstead
    • Description: The workshop covers essential questions that need to be addressed in order to effectively create an efficient and sustainable workflow for providing copyright information to your users. The instructor will share copyright management strategies and provide practical planning tips and examples of workflows from differing organizations both large and small. As a group, we will review case studies to illustrate the questions and types of issues that pop up when dealing with unique special collections. We will provide resources, and discuss how to determine the best choice for rights statements and how institutions can apply them strategically.

  • Creating and Preserving Oral Histories
    • Contributers: Annie Peterson
    • Description: Popularity of oral histories has been increasing since the mid 20th century when they were used as a research tool to discover the stories of the people behind the labor and political movements of the time. The content of oral history interviews is grounded in reflections on the past as opposed to commentary on purely contemporary events. Oral history can refer to a method of recording and preserving oral testimony and to the product of that process. A successful oral history programs require goals, procedures, and training as well as a plan for access to the interview’s content. The class will also cover the selection and set-up of recording equipment to ensure high quality recordings.

  • Creating Online Exhibits: New Ways to Reach Out, Advocate, and Publicize Your Collections and Services
    • Contributers: Leigh Grinstead, Leigh Grinstead
    • Description: Planning an online exhibit includes incorporating digital content, writing for the web, making strategic hardware and software choices, and developing the internal processes needed to make an online exhibition happen. During this online class you’ll examine successful online exhibit models developed in various cultural heritage settings and leave with a complete toolkit and an effective online exhibit plan. Supplemental reference materials and evaluation criteria will enable you to develop exhibits that are content rich, meaningful, and interactive for your online visitors.

  • Crisis Communication and Reputation Management for Performing Arts Organizations
    • Contributers: Kathleen Donohue Rennie, Kathleen Donohue Rennie
    • Description: You serve on the staff of a local performing arts organization. A press release was tweeted from a local environmental group stating that your theatre’s plumbing system is leaching untreated waste into the community’s waterway. While the press release is inaccurate, season ticket holders and donors are demanding answers. And, the organization’s Twitter handle is blowing up. You have an interview with the editor of the state newspaper in five minutes. What do you say? What do you do?

  • Crowdsourcing for Digital Collections
    • Contributers: Leigh Grinstead, Leigh Grinstead
    • Description: Join us to dig in to this special topic and leave with practical information that you can apply to contemporary crowdsourcing projects. The instructors will focus on applying basic definitions common in crowdsourcing but also point to a number of model projects that can be found in archives, museums, scientific collections, libraries and other organizations that we can learn from. The class will examine infrastructure needs, successful workflows, and lessons learned. In addition, the class will also talk about how crowdsourcing projects can be used to: Develop community; Market and build new audiences for digital collections; Engage internal stakeholders with strategic initiatives; Relate to digital humanities initiatives.

  • Cultural Intelligence: What it is and Why it Matters: Part 2 of the Cultural Intelligence Series
    • Contributers: Michele Villagran, Dr. Michele A. L. Villagran
    • Description: Our libraries are very diverse. Whether you work across international borders or interact with diversity closer to home, we deal with uniqueness and differences. Culture matters in how we market ourselves, how we market to our patrons, and ultimately can make the difference between whether you thrive or flounder when faced with an intercultural situation. Cultural intelligence is a form of intelligence that draws upon the ability to reformulate one's concept of self and others. It can be integrated with other forms of intelligence and applies to any cultural context (i.e., diversity initiatives, organizational culture, generational culture, gender culture, etc.).

  • Customer Service Basics for Any Librarian
    • Contributers: Jodie Borgerding, Jodie Borgerding
    • Description: Information seekers interact daily with library staff to meet their information needs. Do you have the necessary customer skills it takes to engage in successful interactions with your patrons? This one hour webinar helps reference staff identify necessary skill sets needed for any reference interaction whether it is face to face, virtual or on the telephone.

  • Design Think Your Way to a Better Library
    • Contributers: Steven Bell, Steven Bell
    • Description: This two-hour webinar introduces participants to design thinking through the exploration of a process that begins with an empathic approach to problem finding that leads to a thoughtful solution. Attendees will gain familiarity with the different phases of the design thinking process through examples of how they are applied in a library environment. While there are other methods leading to decisions for making libraries better, design thinking lends itself to staff engagement opportunities for collaborative problem finding and solving.

  • Digital Collection Policy Development and Content Selection/Prioritization
    • Contributers: Leigh Grinstead, Leigh Grinstead
    • Description: For many of us, our special collections and archives include correspondence, diaries, research materials, family photographs, scrapbooks, oral histories, audio and video materials—and much of it is wonderful. Over the years our predecessors may have arranged and roughly organized the materials, but when it comes to digitization it is difficult for even the most sophisticated institution to know where to start. Even if your institution has been digitizing materials for years it may be in a very ad hoc way and at some point in time most organizations need to pull back and set some guidelines, policies, and put strategies in place to prioritize their digitization work. This class will help you walk through that process.

  • Digital Curation Workflow and Tools
    • Contributers: Leigh Grinstead
    • Description: The workshop covers essential questions that will need to be answered in order to create an efficient and sustainable workflow for digital preservation. The instructor will share digital preservation management strategies and provide practical planning tips and examples of workflows from differing organizations both large and small. As a group, we will review topics such as best practices for inventory, policies, and storage. We will also cover basic information about software options, provide resources, and discuss how to determine the best choice for institutions evaluating digital preservation solutions today.

  • Digital Stewardship Fundamentals
    • Contributers: Leigh Grinstead, Annie Peterson
    • Description: Is your institution embarking on a digitization project? Have you been accessioning digital collections, but want to make sure that you are prepared to handle the long-term preservation needs that are specific to these digital items? This two hour class will present strategies for maintaining long term access to your digital collections and a discussion of key principles for the creation, maintenance, and preservation.

  • Digitization for Small Institutions
    • Contributers: Annie Peterson
    • Description: Participants will learn about starting a digitization program. The first session covers the basics of project planning, equipment selection, digitization preparation, care and during digitization. The second session covers technical information relevant to getting started with digitization, such as metadata, file format selection, compression, and more. The class also covers quality control, access, and touches upon basic concepts of digital preservation as relevant to small institutions planning digital projects.

  • Disaster Planning and Preparedness
    • Contributers: Annie Peterson
    • Description: Disaster can strike at any time in any locale, disrupting operations, threatening human safety, and damaging or destroying collections. Having a plan in place before disaster strikes makes good business sense; institutions that view emergency management as critical and provide staff with the authority and tools to plan will ultimately respond more successfully than those that have not prepared. This class is an overview of different steps that cultural heritage institutions can take to be better prepared for a disaster of any size. The sessions cover risk assessment and mitigation, creating a disaster plan, collections salvage procedures, techniques for training staff, and touches on creating emergency response networks.

  • Disaster Response for Performing Arts Organizations
    • Contributers: Steve Eberhardt, Donia Conn
    • Description: Emergency response can be a daunting prospect for performing arts organizations. This webinar will lay out the basic tenets of responding to an emergency including support organizations, working with vendors, and helpful resources for organization and planning. There will also be a brief introduction to the Incident Command System so that performing arts centers can work more seamlessly with their local first responders.

  • DuraCloud Overview: Use Cases for Preservation Storage
    • Contributers: Heather Greer Klein, Heather Greer Klein
    • Description: Join us for an overview of DuraCloud, an easy to use preservation storage service. We will cover what DuraCloud is, common use cases, and how libraries, archives, and museums are using DuraCloud as part of their digital preservation workflow. We will also discuss the Chronopolis Network dark archive storage option, and end with a brief demonstration of the DuraCloud Sync Tool.

  • Efficiency in Digitization
    • Contributers: Doug Peterson
    • Description: Efficiency is about getting more for less. And while there is single method to digitize efficiently, this session, led by new LYRASIS partner, Digital Transitions Division of Cultural Heritage, will provide an overview on six different methods to increase your efficiencies. The session will cover Measurement, Standards, Investment and Collaboration. Examples of how other Digital Transition library clients are handling issues and how results were realized will be discussed. If you are considering digitization and/or necessary hardware investment, consider joining this session. Our new partnership with Digital Transitions provides discounts to LYRASIS members.

  • Emergency Online Teaching: Practical Techniques for adapting library instruction during Covid-19
    • Contributers: Jason Puckett, Jason Puckett
    • Description: Get concrete advice and best practices for strategizing and implementing effective library teaching during this season of unexpected online learning. You’ll learn practical techniques for creating clear online teaching materials to scale to your institution, maximizing your outreach to faculty, and lower “friction” between your students and the library resources they need. All the techniques in this session are applicable to whatever technology you’re using for your online instruction.

  • Essentials of Usability Design for Library Research Guides
    • Contributers: Jason Puckett, Jason Puckett
    • Description: Web design, in the form of creating online research guides, has become a big part of many librarians’ jobs, but we’re rarely taught how to do it well. Most of us learn the nuts and bolts of how to make guides, without learning the principles of how to make them usable — the simple techniques of visual and textual design that can help us create guides that users will understand more easily, and stick around to use.

  • Establishing an Environmental Monitoring Program
    • Contributers: Annie Peterson
    • Description: Creating a good environment for collections, by controlling temperature and humidity, is one of the most important elements of long-term collections preservation. The first step towards creating a good environment is knowing your challenges. Collecting data using loggers that automatically track temperature and relative humidity (RH) over time helps assess your environment and identify ways to improve it. This session will review why it temperature and RH control is critical for preservation. The session will cover basics of using data loggers, including placement within collections storage spaces. Participants will then learn about and discuss how to interpret data collected by loggers, and how that data can be used to advocate for collections care.

  • Establishing Emergency Response Networks for Cultural Collections
    • Contributers: Annie Peterson
    • Description: Disasters big and small can affect buildings and the collections they hold at any time. In the crucial first hours, you shouldn’t have to worry about whom to call for assistance. This class examines how to set up a local emergency response network that will help protect your cultural institution when an emergency strikes and establish mutual assistance and reliance amongst the other institutions in your area.

  • Evaluating Digital Projects
    • Contributers: Leigh Grinstead
    • Description: Using a series of case studies the class will examine how to appraise digital projects and will give practical guidance that can be applied in any setting. By the end of the class students will be able to understand and define the differences between various evaluation techniques, and to be able to assess the most successful approach for their own projects in order to make a determination about what will work best in their own environment.

  • Evolve Your Public Space
    • Contributers: Jennifer Bielewski, Brian Pichman
    • Description: With 2017 coming to an end, our overarching theme heading into 2018 is lasting Innovation + IMPACT. How do libraries, archives and museums expand services and spaces to encompass innovation and build long-lasting IMPACT? Join Brian Pichman of the Evolve Project as he shares how you can be part of changing the way people see libraries by doing a few cost effective innovative things for lasting impact. Reimagine your space with collaborative space, emerging technologies, a fostering learning environment and transform it in 2018.

  • FADGI Metrics, Part 1
    • Contributers: Jennifer Bielewski, Jim Studnicki, Don Williams
    • Description: Welcome to the LYRASIS Webinar Series: FADGI (Federal Agencies Digitization Guidelines Initiative): Standards-Compliant Still Image Digitization. What makes an image a "good" image? How can image quality be measured in a standards-compliant, repeatable fashion? Digitization consumes resources, and there only may be a single opportunity to convert certain collections; how can we make sure that it is done in accordance with the relevant guidelines and that the digital assets created will endure over the long term? This series of webinars will examine the Federal Agency Digitization Guidelines Initiative (FADGI) as it applies to still imaging for cultural heritage institutions. After an overview of FADGI, we will spend time reviewing each of its core metrics in detail, and share hands-on and practical applications of these metrics in real digitization projects. This webinar series is most suitable for attendees with medium to advanced photographic knowledge, preferably those who have already been through several digitization projects. Previous hands-on experience with digital cameras / scanners and software such as Adobe Photoshop and Capture One Pro will be very helpful.

  • FADGI Metrics, Part 2
    • Contributers: Jennifer Bielewski, Jim Studnicki, Don Williams
    • Description: Welcome to part 2 of LYRASIS Webinar Series: FADGI (Federal Agencies Digitization Guidelines Initiative): Standards-Compliant Still Image Digitization. What makes an image a "good" image? How can image quality be measured in a standards-compliant, repeatable fashion? Digitization consumes resources, and there only may be a single opportunity to convert certain collections; how can we make sure that it is done in accordance with the relevant guidelines and that the digital assets created will endure over the long term? This series of webinars will examine the Federal Agency Digitization Guidelines Initiative (FADGI) as it applies to still imaging for cultural heritage institutions. After an overview of FADGI, we will spend time reviewing each of its core metrics in detail, and share hands-on and practical applications of these metrics in real digitization projects. This webinar series is most suitable for attendees with medium to advanced photographic knowledge, preferably those who have already been through several digitization projects. Previous hands-on experience with digital cameras / scanners and software such as Adobe Photoshop and Capture One Pro will be very helpful.

  • FADGI Metrics, Part 3
    • Contributers: Jennifer Bielewski, Jim Studnicki, Don Williams
    • Description: Welcome to part 3 of LYRASIS Webinar Series: FADGI (Federal Agencies Digitization Guidelines Initiative): Standards-Compliant Still Image Digitization. What makes an image a "good" image? How can image quality be measured in a standards-compliant, repeatable fashion? Digitization consumes resources, and there only may be a single opportunity to convert certain collections; how can we make sure that it is done in accordance with the relevant guidelines and that the digital assets created will endure over the long term? This series of five webinars will examine the Federal Agency Digitization Guidelines Initiative (FADGI) as it applies to still imaging for cultural heritage institutions. After an overview of FADGI, we will spend time reviewing each of its core metrics in detail, and share hands-on and practical applications of these metrics in real digitization projects.

  • Fedora 6 Overview
    • Contributers: David Wilcox, David Wilcox
    • Description: Fedora 6, the next major version of Fedora, will focus on digital preservation by aligning with the Oxford Common File Layout (OCFL). The OFCL is an application-independent approach to the storage of digital objects in a structured, transparent, and predictable manner. This provides many benefits, including content that is parsable by both humans and machines and the ability to rebuild the repository from the files it stores. Fedora 6 will replace the current ModeShape backend with a more scalable and performant implementation that persists data in accordance with the OCFL specification. This webinar will provide an overview of the Fedora 6 design, including a brief introduction to the OCFL and how it is being implemented, along with a summary of development progress to date and the anticipated timeline for the 6.0 release.

  • Field Guide to Digital Preservation
    • Contributers: Frances Harrell, Frances Harrell
    • Description: Are you just starting to learn about digital preservation? Have you wondered how digital preservation is different from digitization? Do OAIS and PREMIS leave you a bit bewildered? Are you concerned about how you can maintain long-term access to your institution’s digital collections?

  • Free Tools for Digital Preservation: An Introduction
    • Contributers: Annie Peterson, Hannah Rosen
    • Description: This two hour session will provide an introduction to tools that can be used to manage digital files in a cultural heritage institution. Instructors will demonstrate basic tools and techniques that can help institutions improve long-term management of digital collections. All tools demonstrated in the class will be freely available so they can be used after the class at no further cost to the institutions. Please note that several of the tools demonstrated in the class are Windows-based and not all work across all systems. Tools and skills demonstrated will include Bulk Rename Utility, basics of command line, Karen’s Hasher, HashMyFiles, Fixity, and Bagger. This class does not cover digitization, or conversion of analog materials to digital files.

  • Free Tools for Digital Preservation: Metadata Manipulation
    • Contributers: Annie Peterson, Hannah Rosen
    • Description: This two hour session will provide a hands-on overview of tools that extract, embed and monitor metadata into digital preservation-quality files. The class will begin with tools that can extract technical metadata from digital files and export them into XML formats. After that, the class will go through the installation and basic implementation of embedded metadata tools for both still image and audiovisual files. Finally, the class will end with tools that can be used to perform quality control on metadata. All tools demonstrated in the class will be freely available so they can be used after the class at no further cost to the institutions. Tools demonstrated will include MediaInfo, ExifTool, ExifTool GUI, Data Accessioner, BWF MetaEdit, mp3tag, and MDQC.

  • Free(ish) Project Management Tools
    • Contributers: Jodie Borgerding, Jodie Borgerding
    • Description: We have all been there, collaborating on a project that tends to get derailed. Many times it is simply due to a lack of organization, communication, and planning. Instead of hiring a certified project manager, try some of the free(ish) tools designed to keep your project on track. This course will provide a basic introduction to the project management lifecycle, with a focus on executing and monitoring. We will also learn about a number of free(ish) project management tools that can help your team successfully complete the project.

  • From Information Literate to Information Fluent: Promoting Student Success in the Transition from High School to University
    • Contributers: Alan Bearman
    • Description: From Information Literate to Information Fluent examines the importance of Information Literacy in promoting student success in the transition from high school to University by focusing on teaching basic skills such as the evaluation of resources and how to engage peers with that information. This project seeks to inform educators on the importance of engaging populations in information literacy learning through the development of open educational resources and curriculum.

  • Generation Z: Libraries and Post-Millennial Generation
    • Contributers: Jodie Borgerding, Jodie Borgerding
    • Description: We've all heard about Millennials, but what do we know about the next generation, Generation Z? According to the American Marketing Association, Generation Z, or those born at the dawn of the 21st century, are just now starting to enter college and the workforce. How can we prepare to meet these new users and tailor our services to their needs? In this hour-long session we will explore the characteristics and demographics of Generation Z, focusing on education and leadership. We will brainstorm and discuss ways libraries can provide services and programs tailored to this group and offer tips for library managers who will be supervising Generation Z staff.

  • Girl, Wash Your Data: Developing a Collections Data Management Project
    • Contributers: Megan Forbes, Megan Forbes
    • Description: Online browsers, linked open data, open access data, federated data - the museum field is being bombarded with opportunities to get our collections information out there, but is our data ready for the big time? This class will walk through the process of planning a collections data management project, focusing on data availability, usability, consistency, and integrity.

  • Going Digital Free Webinar
    • Contributers: Annie Peterson, Hannah Rosen
    • Description: Join us for a one hour free webinar that briefly introduces the critical components of digital content creation and collection development.

  • Grant Writing for Digitization and Preservation Projects
    • Contributers: Annie Peterson
    • Description: This four-hour class, which will be offered online in two-hour increments, focuses on preparing for and writing grants for digitization and/or preservation projects. The class covers the grant writing process from start to finish. Starting with finding funding opportunities, moving on to writing a proposal, through the grant review process, and finally covers grants administration and promoting grant-funded projects. The class also addresses collaborating on grant projects. General grant writing information can be applied to grant opportunities from a range of different funding agencies, but the focus of examples given in the class is on the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) and the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH), since they are major funders for a range of institutions.

  • Health and Safety for Performing Arts Organizations
    • Contributers: Ellen Korpar, Ellen Korpar
    • Description: Safety in the theatre extends to crews, casts, and audience members as well as the venue. This includes performance and rehearsal spaces, shops, and other work spaces. It requires awareness, common sense, and perseverance to eliminate hazards and guard against carelessness. The goal of this webinar is to ensure that a safe, healthy environment is maintained at all times. This includes the control and minimization of all known and potential hazards associated within creative, artistic, and performance development. These risks can be minimized and controlled through proper training, equipment, and use of appropriate precautions, restrictions, and established safe-work practices.

  • How to Ask for $ in Tough Times: 12 Tactics in 24 Minutes
    • Contributers: Matt Lehrman, Matt Lehrman
    • Description: In the face of prolonged disruption and uncertainty, how can nonprofits ask donors for support in ways that are highly compelling yet incredibly sensitive? This webinar offers an espresso shot collection of ideas and practices to help nonprofit leaders ask for – and secure – the contributions upon which their organizations depend. Following the presentation, there's plenty of additional time for decaffeinated Q&A.

  • Inclusion of 3D Artifacts into a Digital Library: Exploring Technologies and Best Practice Techniques
    • Contributers: Jennifer Bielewski, Jenny Johnson, Kristi Palmer
    • Description: Advances in 3D technologies are providing libraries and museums the opportunity to capture 3D artifacts in digital formats. The Center for Digital Scholarship at IUPUI University Library is implementing workflows and determining best practices to incorporate 3D images into an already established community and cultural heritage digital collections. This presentation will highlight the work that has taken place over the last two years (2015-2017), highlighting the accomplishments and challenges of 3D scanning. As the head of digitization services for the IUPUI University Library Center for Digital Scholarship, Jenny Johnson develops digital projects in collaboration with Community and Cultural Heritage Institutions. Jenny has over 15 years of experience managing activities relating to digitization, access and preservation of historic collections. Her most recent work includes the implementation of 3D technologies into the Center's workflow and working to establish 3D digitization best practices.

  • Intro to FADGI for Still Image Digitization
    • Contributers: Jennifer Bielewski, Jim Studnicki, Don Williams
    • Description: The Webinar Series begins with Don Williams giving an overview of the FADGI guidelines, their purpose, and his work with the Still Image Working Group, and Jim Studnicki discussing the high-level implications of applying FADGI to cultural heritage digitization projects. Concepts including the FADGI metrics and Star Tiers are introduced, as are the targets and software used to measure technical image quality.

  • Introduction to Audio Visual Digitization
    • Contributers: Annie Peterson
    • Description: This class will enable students to create an outline of a digital project management plan for audio visual collections and understand the resources available for next steps. This class will cover the differences in Machine-based AV Collections, review the history of recording devices, and acknowledge preservation issues. Students leaving the class will have a solid understanding of digital audio and video files, modes of capture, best practice for digital audio and video, quality control procedures, storage and preservation issues

  • Introduction to BitCurator: Using BitCurator to Support Digital Curation
    • Contributers: Christopher (Cal) Lee, Christopher (Cal) Lee
    • Description: This ninety-minute online class will explore how and why library, archives and museums (LAMs) can use the open-source BitCurator environment to support digital curation goals, including: creation of authentic copies of data on disks; reflection of the original order of materials; establishment of more trustworthy chains of custody; discovery and exposure of associated contextual information; and identification of sensitive information that should be filtered, redacted or masked in appropriate ways.. We’ll explore the layers of hardware and software that allow bitstreams on digital media to be read as files, the roles and relationships of these layers, and tools and techniques for ensuring the completeness and evidential value of data.

  • Introduction to Collections Data Management
    • Contributers: Megan Forbes, Megan Forbes
    • Description: This class will provide an overview of several core data management frameworks, adapted for use in a cultural heritage collections environment, including the Data Management Body of Knowledge and the emerging Datapractices.org project. Attendees will gain an understanding of what good data management is, learn how to evaluate current data management practices within their own organizations, and take the first steps toward creating a data management plan.

  • Introduction to Computer Aided Design (CAD) for Archivists
    • Contributers: Tim Walsh
    • Description: This course will give you the tools and knowledge to begin working with computer aided design (CAD) files in the context of digital archives. CAD software packages such as AutoCAD, Microstation, Rhino, and SketchUp are used by architects, engineers, product designers, facilities managers, and others to design, maintain, and renovate buildings and other built projects. CAD files are highly complex and often proprietary 2D vector drawings or 3D models that pose significant challenges for digital preservation. These challenges are only increasing as more complex Building Information Modeling (BIM) software such as Revit and ArchiCAD gradually supplants CAD as the new tool of choice for building design and maintenance. Whether your institution collects in architecture and related design disciplines, has received CAD and/or BIM files as part of larger personal paper or institutional records collections, or is responsible for long-term archiving of design records used by local facilities managers, it is likely that CAD files already are or will someday be part of your collection. This course aims to give basic literacy in CAD to enable archivists to preserve, describe, and provide access to these files.

  • Introduction to Copyright for Digitization
    • Contributers: Leigh Grinstead, Leigh Grinstead
    • Description: Are you planning for a digitization project? Whether you are new to digitization or looking to expand your efforts, you may be considering the copyright issues and implications for your project. What is protected by copyright? What isn’t? Do you have the rights to put materials online? Can you get permission or are items in the public domain? This two hour live online class will cover the basics of copyright law and will include information about public domain, fair use, due diligence, the permissions process and orphan works.

  • Introduction to Dublin Core Metadata
    • Contributers: Leigh Grinstead, Leigh Grinstead
    • Description: This two-hour online class will help you lay some of the basic groundwork needed to implement Dublin Core metadata in your institution. For those familiar with MARC or other cataloging schema we will discuss how Dublin Core can be integrated into your workflow.

  • Introduction to Emergency Digital Collecting
    • Contributers: Kara McClurken, Kara McClurken
    • Description: Have you experienced a crisis in your community and wanted to immediately start collecting materials, but didn’t know where to begin? This class will help your institution prepare to respond to an unexpected event in your community and quickly collect and provide access to digital materials including photos, videos, and social media. The session will cover preparing for emergency collecting, including establishing a team and creating policies, and will examine a case study from the University of Virginia (UVA), as well as a table top exercise to assess your institution’s current readiness to respond. UVA’s crisis collecting workflows and tools were tested in the “Unite the Right” rally and community response in Charlottesville in 2017, and have grown and evolved since then. While the focus is on documenting in an emergency, the tools and approaches can be utilized for planned events as well, such as community anniversaries, inaugurations, and celebrations.

  • Introduction to Emergency Preparedness for Performing Arts Organizations
    • Contributers: Steve Eberhardt, Janet Newcomb
    • Description: Localized emergencies, regional disasters, and catastrophic events can have a devastating impact on performing arts organizations where even a brief loss of business can threaten sustainability. This 90 minute webinar will provide an introduction to why emergency preparedness is critical to protect your organization from external risks and internal vulnerabilities. These include human caused and natural crises. You will learn the typical process and contents of a plan, and receive information about resources to help with planning. This webinar is appropriate for attendees representing large and small performing arts organizations as well as those with and without their own performance facilities. Executive and management staff will find this webinar useful, as well as H.R., finance, communications, marketing, technical, and front-of-house staff. This session is part of a series presented by the Performing Arts Readiness (PAR) project. Other topics in this series will include Risk Assessment, Business Continuity Planning, Disaster Networks, and Venue Safety. The PAR project is funded through a generous grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

  • Introduction to Fedora
    • Contributers: David Wilcox, David Wilcox
    • Description: Fedora is a flexible, extensible, open source repository platform for managing, preserving, and providing access to digital content. This session will provide an overview of the software and basic concepts, examples of deployments, and an overview and demonstration of the core features. We will also discuss ways to get involved with the Fedora community and how Fedora can help your organization preserve and provide access to your digital content.

  • Introduction to IT Security for Libraries and Librarians
    • Contributers: Blake Carver
    • Description: We all know we should use good passwords, keep everything updated and follow other basic precautions online. Understanding the reasons behind these rules is critical to help us convince ourselves and others that the extra work is indeed worth it. Who are the bad guys? What are tools are they using? What are they after? Where are they working? How are they doing it? Why are we all targets? We'll talk about how to stay safe at the library and at home. Join Blake Carver, Systems Administrator at LYRASIS to learn strategies for IT security. We'll talk ways to keep your precious data safe inside the library and out -- securing your network, website, and PCs, and tools you can teach to patrons in computer classes. We’ll tackle security myths, passwords, tracking, malware, and more, covering a range of tools and techniques, making this session ideal for any library staff.: Week One - The If When Who What When Where How and Whys of IT Security: Who and How and What; Why is this all important; Privacy & Security in general; The 5 basic things that make a big difference. Week Two - Out Running The Bear: Passwords & 2 Factor Authentication; Securing Devices; Mobile/Desktop - OS & Everything; Browsers & Tor; Email; Staying Safe On-line (General Tips); Wi-Fi; Social Media. Week Three - Security in Libraries: Training: Thinking & Behavior; Threat Modeling; Hardware and Networks. Week Four - The Hidden World Of Systems Security: Web Servers and Networks; Backups; Drupal and Wordpress and Joomla; Servers in general.

  • Introduction to Project Management
    • Contributers: Jodie Borgerding, Jodie Borgerding
    • Description: Implementing a systematic approach to project management can drastically improve the outcomes for an initiative as well as create a more efficient workflow in information organizations. This course is designed to provide an introduction to project management strategies and implementation for the information professional. The primary focus of the course will be on the core values of project management. This course is not specific to technology project management.

  • It Takes a Village: A Deeper Dive into Community Engagement
    • Contributers: Laurie Arp, Christine Di Bella, Megan Forbes
    • Description: This session focuses on community engagement as an important facet of long-term sustainability. The session will provide an overview of the sustainability framework. It will then focus on and cover the components of community engagement, and barriers found by programs pursuing sustainable engagement. The session will feature a case study and provide the opportunity for group discussion about specific issues participants are facing.

  • It Takes a Village: A Deeper Dive into Governance
    • Contributers: Laurie Arp, Laurie Arp, Megan Forbes, Michael Winkler, Megan Forbes
    • Description: This session focuses on governance as an important facet of long-term sustainability. The session will provide an overview of the sustainability framework. It will then focus on and cover the components of governance, and barriers found by programs pursuing sustainable governance. The session will feature a case study and provide the opportunity for group discussion about specific issues participants are facing.<

  • It Takes a Village: A Deeper Dive into Resources
    • Contributers: Laurie Arp, James Beach, Megan Forbes
    • Description: This session focuses on resources (whether people or funding) as an important facet of long-term sustainability. The session will provide an overview of the sustainability framework. It will then focus on and cover the components of resourcing, and barriers found by programs pursuing sustainable resourcing. The session will feature a case study and provide the opportunity for group discussion about specific issues participants are facing.

  • It Takes a Village: A Deeper Dive into Technology
    • Contributers: Laurie Arp, David Wilcox, Megan Forbes
    • Description: This session focuses on technology as an important facet of long-term sustainability. The session will provide an overview of the sustainability framework. It will then focus on and cover the components of technology, and barriers found by programs pursuing sustainable technology. The session will feature a case study and provide the opportunity for group discussion about specific issues participants are facing.

  • It Takes a Village: Open Source Software Models of Collaboration and Sustainability – Themes and Future Directions Webinar
    • Contributers: Megan Forbes, Laurie Arp
    • Description: Why do some community-supported open source programs seem more successful than others? Why do some live on grants while some achieve financial sustainability? What can open source program staff learn from one another? In 2017, the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) provided grant funding to enable LYRASIS to assess how open-source software (OSS) programs serving cultural and scientific heritage organizations attain long-term sustainability. The project assumed that while there is no single approach to sustainability, there may be common threads among programs that would lead to common needs and strategies for meeting those needs. We developed a survey and conducted a two-day forum in Baltimore in the fall of 2017, during which representatives of over 25 OSS programs discussed project lifecycles, governance, financing, resources, community building, outreach and communications, and bumps in the road. The findings have been condensed into a guidebook to be shared with the larger community. Speakers will provide an overview of the survey and forum, the overall themes that emerged, and gather feedback on potential next steps the community can take to further sustainability across open source programs.

  • Loaning and Borrowing Special Collections
    • Contributers: Annie Peterson
    • Description: Libraries, archives, historical societies and other organizations with special collections sometimes share collections for use by a different institution for research, exhibition, or other purposes. In order to protect special collections during transport and loan, institutions need policies and procedures for loaning and borrowing special collections materials. This class will cover the benefits and challenges of loaning and borrowing special collections materials, as well as guidelines for cultural heritage institutions loaning or borrowing materials.

  • LYRASIS ArchivesSpace Hosting Services Demo
    • Contributers: Madeline Sheldon
    • Description: Join us for this one hour demonstration of the LYRASIS ArchivesSpace Hosting Services.

  • LYRASIS ArchivesSpace Lone Arranger Hosting Services Demo
    • Contributers: Madeline Sheldon
    • Description: Join us for this one hour demonstration of the LYRASIS ArchivesSpace Lone Arranger Hosting Services.

  • LYRASIS CollectionSpace Hosting Services Demo
    • Contributers: Madeline Sheldon
    • Description: Join us for this one hour demonstration of the LYRASIS CollectionSpace Hosting Services.

  • LYRASIS Free Webinar: NEH Preservation Assistance Grants
    • Contributers: Annie Peterson, Margaret Walker
    • Description: Join us for an overview of National Endowment for the Humanities Preservation Assistance Grants, including eligible activities, the application process, the review process, and more. Senior Program Officer Mary Downs will provide information and answers to your questions.

  • LYRASIS Islandora Hosting Services Demo
    • Contributers: Madeline Sheldon
    • Description: Join us for this one hour demonstration of the LYRASIS Islandora Hosting Services.

  • LYRASIS Leaders Circle: Action, Innovation, Impact
    • Contributers: Jennifer Bielewski
    • Description: In this session, learn about the LYRASIS Leaders Circle. What is it and how to join. Learn who your fellow leaders are within the community of LYRASIS and at large in the archive, library and museum field. The Leaders Circle is our membership tier that is action focused; moving the communities local and global towards innovation, collaboration and change for the greatest impact and outreach.

  • LYRASIS Leaders Forum: Scholarly Communications in a Crisis Panel
    • Contributers: Robert Miller
    • Description: Scholarly communications in academia reach far beyond institutional walls. With impact in so many places (publishing, research, institutional public relations, human resources, corporate R&D, and librarianship) it serves us well to maintain an awareness of current trends in the field. That baseline need is amplified by the upheaval caused by a pandemic. To that end, we’ve enlisted a panel of experts who have been able to react to these new realities vis-à-vis scholarly communications. The panel will discuss the parts of their practice and philosophy that have had to change and how that manifests in their daily interactions. They represent large and small institutions with schol comm programs both well established and less so. Please join us for this cross-sectional view into managing Scholarly Communications in a Crisis.

  • LYRASIS Open Content Webinar Series - Webinar 1 (For LYRASIS Members)
    • Contributers: Celeste Feather
    • Description: This first session of the LYRASIS Open Content Webinar Series is designed to be an interactive introduction to the Open Content movement. We will begin by looking at the dizzying landscape of terms used to describe Open Content, and what each of them means. Later in the session we will open the audio channels for participants and discuss questions such as: ~Why should we care? ~Why is it important? ~What are your concerns about the movement? ~What questions do you have about LYRASIS’ role in the Open Content space?

  • LYRASIS Second Fridays - Creating an Open Textbook Publishing Program: Inside PDXOpen
    • Contributers: Jennifer Bielewski, Karen Bjork
    • Description: In this session, Karen Bjork from Portland State University will talk to us about how they created PDXOpen. PDXOpen is an open access textbook publishing initiative to support Portland State faculty developing open access textbooks and instill the importance of open access and education.

  • LYRASIS Second Fridays - Creating and Migrating a Local History Digital Collection with Limited Resources
    • Contributers: Jennifer Bielewski, Bridget Striker
    • Description: A stick of gum, paperclips and elbow grease: Creating [and migrating] a local history digital collection with limited resources but a whole lot of tenacity. This 2nd Friday session showcases The Boone County Public Library's Local History Digital Repository. We’ll hear from BCPL’s Bridget Striker, BCPL Local History Coordinator. This is a unique collection of Boone County history, composed of photographs, family files and documents, oral history interviews and historical society videos. The collection was built one item at a time using donations from individual community members, county agencies and historic preservation organizations. Since 2003, BCPL has digitized over 100,000 assets, 14,000 of which are available online via the digital asset management system. Find out how BCPL leveraged user agreements, open source products and community goodwill to create their ever growing digital collection.

  • LYRASIS Second Fridays - Formalizing Diversity, Equity, Inclusion and Accessibility (DEIA) Efforts at the University of Michigan Library
    • Contributers: Jeff Witt
    • Description: Jeff Witt, the Diversity and Inclusion Specialist for the Univ of Michigan Library will discuss how and why his position was created. He will also discuss how he is using the creation and implementation of a formal diversity plan to leverage and amplify the library's efforts related to DEIA.

  • LYRASIS Second Fridays - Hacking Hemingway, Building Capacity: Using Grants to Jump Start Access and Care
    • Contributers: Jennifer Bielewski, Leigh Tarullo, Emily Reigher
    • Description: With the support of LYRASIS, the Oak Park Public Library successfully completed back to back grant projects from 2015-2017, focusing on digitization, finding aids, and engagement. The speakers will discuss how they addressed access and collections care simultaneously, built institutional capacity, and engaged with community partners such as The Ernest Hemingway Foundation of Oak Park.

  • LYRASIS Second Fridays - How to Get Involved with Evolve!
    • Contributers: Jennifer Bielewski, Brian Pichman
    • Description: In this session, we’ll hear from Brian Pichman of the Evolve Project as he shares his startup story of the Evolve Project and how you can be part of changing the way people see libraries. Brian, who grew up in libraries, found a way to merge his passions of technology, entrepreneurialism, and libraries into a collaborative platform called the Evolve Project. The Evolve Project seeks out education based, innovative technology companies that help people learn about coding, robotics, circuits, 3D Printing, AR/VR, and more. He then partners them up with libraries from around the world to do pilot programs and beta programs - along with spreading the word of what the companies offer. He works collaboratively with companies (at no charge or commission structure) in hopes to build bridges with libraries to offer unique opportunities and exposure to new ideas, technology, and people. Brian will share some of his favorite companies, how libraries can be involved, and learn how he makes partnerships - so you could seek out your own too!

  • LYRASIS Second Fridays - Message Dissemination During a Crisis: Columbus Metropolitan Library’s Main Library Shooting
    • Contributers: Jennifer Bielewski, Gregg Dodd
    • Description: Libraries are faced with unique challenges in a 24-hour news cycle world. Libraries must be ready to communicate quickly about any crisis impacting their reputation. Effective crisis management in the new media era is defined not only by the message, but by the speed with which it is delivered. A crisis rarely comes announced and will always leave an impact on a library’s reputation. It is essential that communications are handled effectively during and in the aftermath of a crisis. Hear from Gregg Dodd, Director of Marketing for Columbus Metropolitan Library, who dealt with a shooting earlier this summer in their Main Library. He’ll provide an overview of the shooting incident and how he executed CML’s crisis communications plan. He’ll share practical strategies that will help you implement a plan and how to navigate the complexities of message dissemination during a crisis.

  • LYRASIS Second Fridays - My Resolution: Less Paper Around the Office
    • Contributers: Nancy Colyar
    • Description: It's time to get organized. Join us in going paperless with Nancy Colyar from Birmingham-Southern College. In this session, Nancy will provide a process and the benefits for going paperless and embracing paperless technology.

  • LYRASIS Second Fridays - Personal Librarians are Building Relationships for Student Success
    • Contributers: Brian Gray
    • Description: Personal librarian services are used to initiate meaningful relationships with students. These "personalized" interactions, often casual or social in nature, are becoming structured into the day-to-day library services used to overcome student fear in asking for assistance. One of the co-chairs of the Personal Librarian and First Year Experience Library Conference will share some insights into the growth of personal librarian programs. Strategies and the variety of styles of personal librarian programs will be shared. Join in the discussion to hear examples of best practices in action and explore the resources available for those starting such a program or looking to make modifications in local efforts.

  • LYRASIS Second Fridays - Transforming the Ivory Tower into a Theater in the Round: Preservation in the 21st Century
    • Contributers: Jennifer Bielewski, Kara McClurken
    • Description: Preservation best practice is often difficult if not impossible to achieve. We don't live in ivory towers; even those of us who work in academic settings. Instead we live in the real world, with all its glorious complications and challenges. Rather than thinking of preservation as something that can or should be achieved in an ivory tower, a better analogy is to think of preservation as a practice better achieved in a theater in the round. Although ivory towers are strong and secure, they are also isolating, opaque and accessible to only a few. Theaters in the round, on the other hand, are accessible, transparent, and allow for many types of interactions between audience and stage. This talk will examine how we might use theaters in the round for inspiration as we all work towards sustainable solutions to the preservation challenges that come our way.

  • LYRASIS Summit 2019 Keynote: Jon Cawthorne
    • Contributers: Jon Cawthorne, Jon Cawthorne
    • Description: LYRASIS Member Summit 2019 keynote speaker Jon E. Cawthorne, Ph.D., Dean of the Wayne State University Library System.

  • LYRASIS Trending Topics - Advocacy for Collections Care
    • Contributers: Laura Hortz Stanton, Laura Hortz Stanton
    • Description: Advocacy is not only external – it is crucial for staff at cultural institutions to be able to advocate internally as well, to board and administration, in order to assure that resources are best allocated. This talk will explore routes for both external and internal advocacy with a focus on collections care: securing time and funding for preservation initiatives and conservation treatment, and will discuss opportunities for incorporating information about preservation into all institutional advocacy efforts.

  • LYRASIS Trending Topics - Beyond the Repository - Promoting Interoperability in Digital Preservation
    • Contributers: Laura Alagna, Laura Alagna
    • Description: This webinar will summarize the work that has been done to date for "Beyond the Repository," including the process and outcomes of the work on the curatorial toolkit and the BagIt profile. Attendees will come away with a better understanding of the challenges to integrating digital preservation tools and systems, and how work on “Beyond the Repository” will promote new best practices in digital preservation interoperability, particularly in LYRASIS programs Fedora and DSpace.

  • LYRASIS Trending Topics - Building a Diversity Plan
    • Contributers: Jeff Witt
    • Description: Most organizations, including academic libraries, speak to diversity and inclusion in their mission statement or core values. However, many organizations struggle to put this mission or value into practice. An organizational diversity plan is a way of collecting and comparing everything an organization is saying, doing and learning related to diversity, equity, inclusion and accessibility (DEIA). Done well, it can become a powerful part of the organizational story and brand and set a trajectory that allows an organization to bravely advance in issues of DEIA. This session will explore not only the building blocks of a good diversity plan, but also address suggested practices of establishing by-in, managing organizational engagement and ensuring continuous improvement.

  • LYRASIS Trending Topics - Collaboration through Analysis: A Journey in Digital Content Management Workflow Analysis
    • Contributers: Andrea Green, Andrea Green
    • Description: The Government Heritage Library is halfway through an initiative to evaluate digital content workflows and tools, which includes interviews with catalogers, agency liaisons, and digital staff, to help identify breakdowns in processes and improve digital projects. This presentation provides a project overview, lessons learned, and tactics used during analysis. By taking the time to step back and analyze our workflows, who’s involved, and what’s used, we’re better positioned for future projects, collaborations, and problem-solving along the way.

  • LYRASIS Trending Topics - Developing Gender-Affirming Library Spaces, Systems, Services and Staff
    • Contributers: Steve Barkley, Erin White, Steve Barkley, Donna E. Coghill, Teresa Doherty, Donna Coghill
    • Description: How can we make libraries more inclusive for people who are trans or nonbinary? In this session we will share practical recommendations from VCU Libraries' 2018 gender-inclusive library workgroup report, and our subsequent work to implement the recommendations in the report. The presenters will help attendees brainstorm small to large changes to library spaces, services, systems, and staff training that can create a more affirming environment at their organizations.

  • LYRASIS Trending Topics - Hidden in Plain Sight: Privacy considerations in Digital Collections
    • Contributers: Virginia Ginnie Dressler, Virginia Ginny Dressler
    • Description: This session will focus on privacy issues in digital collections, geared towards practitioners who manage digital collections. Basic concepts around privacy will be discussed, including privacy violations and types of personal data. Ethical decision-making models will be shared, as well as a few case studies to highlight the complexities around issues of privacy. Finally, recommendations for working in a privacy assessment and review will be provided.

  • LYRASIS Trending Topics - Incorporating Equity, Openness, and Inclusion into your Professional Work
    • Contributers: Yasmeen Shorish, Yasmeen Shorish
    • Description: Building on the themes present in the ACRL publication, Open and Equitable Scholarly Communications: Creating a More Inclusive Future, this session will focus on the ways that library professionals can incorporate the concepts of equity, openness, and inclusion into the work they are already doing, or that they aspire to do.

  • LYRASIS Trending Topics - New Tools for Digital Preservation Assessment and Training
    • Contributers: Annie Peterson, Annie Peterson & Becky Geller, Becky Geller
    • Description: LYRASIS and the Northeast Document Conservation Center collaborated on a grant to develop new ways to support institutions in their digital preservation efforts. The project team developed and tested a peer assessment handbook and workshops, guide for preservation assessors, and other resources to support institutions in their digital preservation efforts. In this webinar presenters will share lessons learned from the project, and introduce attendees to the freely available resources that can be used to plan for digital preservation at their institutions. Find more information about the grant and related publications https://www.nedcc.org/preservation-training/digital-preservation-assessment-training.

  • LYRASIS Trending Topics - The LYRASIS 2019 Accessibility Report
    • Contributers: Hannah Rosen, Hannah Rosen
    • Description: This session will be dedicated to reviewing the methodology and the results of the LYRASIS 2019 Accessibility Report. Accessibility, as defined in the report, means accommodating users with various forms of disability, such as physical, visual or hearing impairment within GLAM institutions, the majority of respondents being academic libraries. The study focused on how libraries are handling accessibility for their online materials, specifically in three areas: acquired (licensed or open access) materials, created content (digitized special collections/archival collections, library publishing), and the systems used to host these items

  • LYRASIS Trending Topics - The LYRASIS 2020 Open Content Survey
    • Contributers: Hannah Rosen, Hannah Rosen
    • Description: This session will be dedicated to reviewing the methodology and the results of the LYRASIS 2020 Open Content Survey, concluded in March 2020. For the purposes of the survey, “open content” is defined as information that can be read/accessed without any barriers, be they paywalls or institutional logins. The webinar will discuss the three sections of the survey covering three different types of open content: open access scholarship, open data, and open educational resources.

  • LYRASIS Trending Topics - Walking on the Wild Side: Innovation through a Museum Venture Fund
    • Contributers: Judy Gradwohl, Judy Gradwohl
    • Description: After twenty-five years of stasis, the San Diego Natural History Museum needed revitalization and a little shaking up. An Evolutionary Venture Fund created an atmosphere of risk tolerance and experimentation. It spurred creative thinking and enthusiasm across the organization, revealing that even the smallest idea could help achieve goals. Learn from the museum’s successes and failures, and apply pieces of the process to your own organization.

  • Making a Difference: Intro to LYRASIS Membership
    • Contributers: Jennifer Bielewski
    • Description: Curious about LYRASIS membership? Whether you are a current or perspective member, join Jennifer Bielewski, LYRASIS Membership Manager & Librarian discuss the benefits of being a part of the LYRASIS community. This 1 hour session is live and online.

  • Making a Difference: Intro to LYRASIS Membership for Archives and Museums
    • Contributers: Jennifer Bielewski
    • Description: Did you know that LYRASIS has many programs and services just for Archives and Museums? Whether you are a current or perspective member, join Jennifer Bielewski, LYRASIS Membership Manager & Librarian to discuss the benefits of being a part of the LYRASIS community.

  • Mapping the Historic West End: Using Digital Resources to tell the Story of an African American Community
    • Contributers: Brandon Lunsford
    • Description: This class will show archivists and others interested in community history the results of a year-long effort to tell the story of an historic African American community in Charlotte through a digital mapping project. The James B. Duke Memorial Library at Johnson C. Smith University created a digital map using Historypin that centralized content including historical photographs, newspaper articles, and oral histories to document the Historic West End, a vibrant 150 year old African American community that surrounds the university on the west side of Charlotte, North Carolina. The neighborhoods are currently faced with rising concerns of gentrification and social change, and the digital map brings resources from several institutions including university and public libraries, historic landmarks and planning departments, and West End community organizations like churches, neighborhood associations, and alumni groups to tell their stories. The class will show how other libraries, museums, community groups, or individuals can organize as well as create digital resources about their neighborhoods in a similar fashion

  • Negotiation for Librarians
    • Contributers: Beth Ashmore
    • Description: Does the idea of negotiating with vendors, administrators or community members make you nervous? Or do you just worry you don’t have the skills and experience necessary to represent your library effectively? If you fit into either of these categories this session is for you. This practical one-hour session with provide you with research on what productive negotiation looks like, how you can use your own strengths to make yourself a confident negotiator, and key techniques for preparing for any type of negotiation. The session will provide real-world library examples that you can apply immediately to your next meeting or conversation.

  • Networking for Disaster Management in the Performing Arts
    • Contributers: Steve Eberhardt, Samantha Forsko, Amy Schwartzman
    • Description: Emergency response and preparedness for performing arts organizations can be a difficult task for individual organizations. This free 90-minute webinar will demonstrate how working with multiple organizations in a network for disaster management can be accomplished. The history of networking for improved emergency preparedness in the cultural heritage, arts, and government sectors will be examined, with an exploration of existing networks. Case studies of the Pennsylvania Cultural Resilience Network and CultureAID in New York City will be presented to help guide you on how to start your own, or join an existing, cooperative disaster network. You will learn how to use the Cultural Placekeeping Guide to direct your networking efforts.

  • Online Instructional Design for Librarians
    • Contributers: Beth Ashmore, Beth Ashmore
    • Description: Librarians are no stranger to working online or instruction, but when the two come together it can occasionally cause a moment’s hesitation. How do we keep tabs on our learners’ progress if we can’t see them? How do we engage them in discussion if everyone’s microphones are muted? What do I need to change about my preparation and delivery to work with online earners? If you find yourself conducting webinars or providing library instruction to online courses, this session is for you. This practical one-hour session will provide you with instructional design basics specifically for the online environments. Bring a lesson you normally teach in-person that can be redesigned for maximum efficacy with online learners.

  • Open Educational Resources: Campus Stakeholders and Strategies for Collaboration
    • Contributers: Ariana Santiago, Ariana Santiago
    • Description: Higher education institutions are increasingly recognizing the value of open educational resources (OER) - or resources that are licensed to allow free access, use, adaptation, and redistribution - as OER eliminate textbook costs, contribute to student success, and allow for pedagogical innovation. Academic libraries often initiate and/or lead OER initiatives, however, OER intersect with and impact many other stakeholders across campus. It is important for OER leaders to understand the perspectives of these stakeholders, including students, instructors, instructional designers, the bookstore, administrators, and more. With an understanding of multiple perspectives around OER, academic libraries can generate buy-in, collaborate with campus partners, and develop broader support for the OER initiative. Attendees will engage with multiple stakeholder perspectives, consider how these perspectives are influenced by their specific institutional context, and develop strategies for collaborating with campus partners. While some background on OER will be covered, this session is intended for librarians that already have a working knowledge of how OER are defined and why they are important.

  • Open source software for showcasing scholarship: An Introduction to VIVO for librarians
    • Contributers: Sharla Lair, Sharla Lair
    • Description: The VIVO Community invites you to attend a webinar to learn more about VIVO. VIVO is a member-supported, open source software and ontology for representing scholarship. It is used around the world by research institutions to support recording, editing, searching, browsing, and visualizing scholarly activity.

  • OpenRefine: Basics of Tidying up your Data
    • Contributers: Jerry Waller, Jerry Waller
    • Description: Do your datasets spark joy? Working with semi-structured or malformed data requires skills that cross disciplines. Fortunately there are tools that make cleaning and standardizing data easier. This class’s goals are to introduce participants to OpenRefine, cover basic strategies for its use, and perform exercises to familiarize them with its capabilities. With a spreadsheet-like interface, OpenRefine is visibly familiar to most users. But where a spreadsheet may be good for entering data, OpenRefine is built to tidy malformed data. This workshop's goals are to introduce participants to OpenRefine, cover basic strategies for its use, and perform exercises to familiarize them with its capabilities.

  • ORCID US Community Showcase
    • Contributers: Sheila Rabun
    • Description: Recorded on September 12. This webinar covers an overview of the ORCID US Community and snapshot of ORCID across the globe, featuring case studies of ORCID adoption and integration from Boston College, Cornell University, New York University, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and the University of Virginia. For more info on the ORCID US Community, visit http://orcid-us.org.

  • ORCID US Community: Making the Most of your ORCID Membership
    • Contributers: Sheila Rabun
    • Description: This ORCID US Community Webinar was recorded on October 2, 2018. This webinar covers an overview of the ORCID US Community, a review of ORCID basics, and considerations for getting the most value from ORCID adoption at a research institution by building stakeholder support, integrating ORCID with systems through the ORCID API, and outreach and education to encourage researchers to use ORCID iDs. Learn more about the ORCID US Community at http://orcid-us.org.

  • Outsourcing Audiovisual Digitization
    • Contributers: Annie Peterson
    • Description: Cultural heritage institutions often choose to outsource digitization of audiovisual materials to work with vendors that have the equipment and expertise required for a wide range of audio, video, and motion picture film formats. Outsourcing still requires significant work on the part of the institution, such as selecting appropriate standards to follow for file formats and metadata. Institutions must also physically prepare items for shipment, prepare metadata for items being digitized, and implement quality control procedures to ensure the quality and accuracy of digitized content.

  • Outsourcing Newspaper Digitization
    • Contributers: Leigh Grinstead
    • Description: Newspapers are an important part of historical documentation. They record a range of important local and national history, but are also a challenging format to preserve and to digitize. Newspapers are large items that contain a huge amount of varied information, just one factor that makes them a good format to outsource for digitization. This class will review factors to consider when selecting a vendor, establishing a contract with a vendor, and effective communication and project management throughout the project. It will also cover best practices for newspaper digitization and other technical considerations. It will touch briefly on managing digital files but is not an in-depth digital preservation class.

  • Pass it On: Social Media, Word-of-Mouth Marketing and Elevator Speeches
    • Contributers: Susan Alman, Dr. Susan Alman
    • Description: Create a buzz about the programs and services at your academic or public library through social media and word-of-mouth (WOM) marketing. Learn how to craft 1-minute marketing messages to share online, face to face, inside or outside the library, and understand how to plan for an effective social media and WOM marketing campaign. Examples of elevator speeches, relevant resources, and other marketing messages will be shared with you during this session.

  • Performing Arts Emergency Preparedness Planning Grants
    • Contributers: Steve Eberhardt
    • Description: The Performing Arts Readiness (PAR) project is now offering grants of up to $7,250 to forty (40) performing arts organizations for the creation of individual institutional emergency preparedness or Continuity of Operations (CoOP) plans. These grants are a part of the PAR project’s work to increase the sustainability of performing arts organizations. This brief webinar will review the goals and guidelines of the grants and provide a forum for questions and discussion. More information about these grants are on the PAR website at http://performingartsreadiness.org/planning-grants.

  • Picture This: Introduction to Digital Imaging
    • Contributers: Leigh Grinstead
    • Description: This class taught in two, two-hour sessions over the course of two days. This online class will help you lay some of the basic groundwork needed to understand how digital images are created. In the class we will define our terms, discuss creating master, access and thumbnail images and quality control procedures. The class will discuss hardware, software and image delivery. The class will also take a look at what can be achieved with the digital imaging best practices recommended in this class.

  • Planning Safe Exhibits and Displays
    • Contributers: Frances Harrell, Frances Harrell
    • Description: Exhibiting special collections can be a great way to connect your community and collections, tell the stories your institution is stewarding, and spark new research. At the same time, public display that does not keep preservation in mind can cause damage to special collections. This session covers selecting objects for exhibit, lighting, security, support materials, and other factors that can protect collections during display. The focus for this webinar is non-museum institutions who are new to displaying collections items or would like to update their practices to better care for objects.

  • Practical Digital Preservation on a Shoestring: Triage for the Underfunded
    • Contributers: Jaime Schumacher
    • Description: This course will help you develop a pragmatic approach to digital preservation, including how to implement a practical workflow for triaging digital materials in your care. We will cover concepts like how different digital preservation tools/services can perform different functions within the digital curation lifecycle, methods for investigating and selecting potential tools/services based on your available resources, and how to make incremental progress towards achieving reasonable preservation goals. The focus will be on low-cost and free tools and services and the instructor will demonstrate these tools in action through a full life-cycle workflow. The focus of this course is on preservation, and not on access or digitization of materials. We will not be addressing the “why” of digital preservation; rather, we are preparing for the “how” of making informed decisions regarding workflows and tool selection. An introductory knowledge of digital preservation issues, such as those outlined in the Digital Preservation Coalition’s Handbook, is required.

  • Practice makes Perfect: Conducting a Tabletop Exercise to Practice your Disaster Plan
    • Contributers: Annie Peterson, Annie Peterson
    • Description: Writing a disaster plan is a great step towards improving your cultural heritage institution’s response to a disaster, but practicing your disaster plan is a crucial part of ensuring everyone involved is prepared to execute the plan in a disaster. A tabletop exercise, where plan stakeholders verbally walk through executing the plan in a hypothetical disaster scenario, can help institutions practice their plan in a low-stress, low-stakes environment. After the exercise, the institution improves their plan and can respond more effectively in a real disaster. Tabletop exercises are common in the emergency management field, but not used as frequently by cultural heritage institutions, so this session aims to provide cultural heritage professionals with the background and tools you need to run your own tabletop exercise. The session will cover more details of what a tabletop exercise is, how to plan and run a tabletop exercise, and how it can improve your institution’s disaster plan

  • Preserving Photograph Collections
    • Contributers: Annie Peterson
    • Description: Photographic materials present significant preservation concerns in cultural heritage collections. They are often heavily used and are fragile and susceptible to damage due to improper handling and storage conditions. Visual examples of photographic processes and deteriorated photographs will be identified and discussed. Taught in two two-hour sessions over the course of two days, topics covered will include: Early photographic through contemporary print processes; Issues with prints, color, film, glass, and albums; Environment and storage guidelines; Handling, housing, and security guidelines.

  • Project Management and Workflow for Digitization Projects
    • Contributers: Leigh Grinstead, Leigh Grinstead
    • Description: In this two-hour live online class, we will discuss the issues to consider and questions to ask in managing the digital workflow process. We will look at the planning, execution and evaluation of digital projects. Look at standards, identifying resources, budgets and high level workflow, and how to turn plans into action. We will also look at how quality control is incorporated into the workflow process and hold a brief discussion of collaboration and working with others, as well as, how to measure success.

  • Promotion and Outreach for Digital Projects
    • Contributers: Annie Peterson
    • Description: Digitization can create much broader access to collections and be a great asset to researchers and individuals interested in using your collections without coming to your institution, but how do you get the word out about all of your digitized content? This class will cover methods for promoting collections to users, discuss case studies from institutions that have successfully promoted their digital collections, and help participants create their own outreach strategies around digital projects.

  • Promotion and Outreach for Preservation
    • Contributers: Annie Peterson
    • Description: Are you looking for ways to start new projects? Do you need support for better care of your collections? Why not take something you are already doing or (would like to do) and use it to help further your preservation goals. Every archives, library, and museum has unique and valuable collections. Learn how to utilize those special treasures to generate interest and resources for both the gems and the general collections. Topics covered include: how preservation outreach can work for your institution, types of outreach activities that will highlight collections care needs, and how to get started turning outreach activities into possible funding. The class will examine the value of virtual and on-site activities to increase community interest, participation, as well as monetary and in-kind donations. Be prepared to talk about what you are already doing and explore ways to take your efforts one step further.

  • Protecting Your Assets: Managing Legacy Materials for Performing Arts Organizations
    • Contributers: Leigh Grinstead
    • Description: Is your organization’s history in a basement, under water pipes, or next to the furnace and unorganized? Performing Arts Organizations often keep a variety of legacy materials, including business records, programs from performances, posters, props, and other artifacts. Using a series of case studies, this class will examine how to collect and organize both physical and digital arts-related materials so you can access these materials for future. The class will give practical guidance that can be applied in any setting. By the end of the class, participants will be able to: Know the difference between records, collections, and series; Decide when documents/collections are important, and when they are not; Determine if and when collections should be treated as archival material; Identify best practices for providing access to archival collections; Understand archival language / vocabulary; Identify model workflows for providing access to archival collections in non-archival settings.

  • Risk Assessment for Performing Arts Organizations
    • Contributers: Annie Peterson, Frances Harrell
    • Description: Natural disasters, local emergencies, and other disruptive events can have devastating effects on all sizes of performing arts organizations. This webinar will focus on mitigating risks at institutions, to prevent disasters from happening and to reduce the impact of unavoidable disasters. The session will clarify the need for risk assessment as a part of an organization’s disaster preparedness strategy, provide basic information on risk assessment tools and practices, and address how risk assessment can benefit performing arts organizations. The instructors will also present case studies as a part of the session, so participants can learn from actual disasters in performing arts organizations.

  • Safety and Security for Performing Arts
    • Contributers: Steve Eberhardt, Emma Stuart
    • Description: This class will help event organizers and venues establish the key elements for prevention and responding to incidents of any shape or size. This class will provide a background of what happens when things don’t go as planned, and show that it doesn’t matter what size or type of event you have, the basic principles are the same. We will look at what you would do in certain scenarios, and how even small adjustments to your venue can keep your event safer.

  • Security in Cultural Heritage Institutions
    • Contributers: Annie Peterson
    • Description: Security is an important part of collections management and preservation. In this class we will discuss conducting a security audit of your institution. We will also cover creating or improving security policies and procedures to help protect your valuable collections in your library, archive, museum, or other cultural heritage organization.

  • Social Crisis Management and the Expanding Role of the Information Professional
    • Contributers: Jennifer Jumba, Jennifer Jumba
    • Description: Crisis situations arise in all types of libraries and impact staff and users. Information professionals must be prepared to meet the social, psychological, medical and legal situations caused by drug overdoses, sexual assault, homelessness, neglect and mental illness. Students will explore the issues and possible resolutions to social crisis management. Technical issues with slides

  • Starting Right: Introduction to Digital Project Management Planning
    • Contributers: Leigh Grinstead, Leigh Grinstead
    • Description: This class is taught in two, two-hour sessions over the course of two days. Over the two days we will cover: Questions to ask before you begin, a discussion of why you are starting a digital project, how to define your audience. We will also discuss questions of intellectual property, how to accept and deal with born digital materials, and defining collection selection criteria. Collection preservation, dealing with culturally sensitive materials, building digital glossaries and Metadata considerations will also be covered. Finally the class will look at staffing considerations, digitization in-house and outsourcing, digital display, infrastructure development, funding and sustainability.

  • Strategies for Successful Virtual Work and Events
    • Contributers: Jessica Crouch, Kate Pugh & Jessica Crouch, Katrina Pugh
    • Description: As COVID-19 impacts cultural heritage institutions, many teams and events are shifting from in-person work and collaboration to working virtually. For institutions who have not previously worked in a primarily virtual environment, this can be a challenging shift. This webinar will provide tips for effective virtual work, including how to facilitate meetings, maintain trust and relationships, and more. The presenters will also discuss how to successfully shift your in-person event with external partners and participants to an online event.

  • Talking the Talk: Professional and Personal Communication Strategies
    • Contributers: Susan Alman
    • Description: There are many factors that impact daily interactions with everyone—library users, colleagues, family and friends—and this workshop will provide participants with some ways to improve interpersonal communication. Special emphasis will be given to personality type, gender, age, socio-economics, listening, and virtual and face-to-face communications. At the end of the session participants will be able to identify many of the factors that impact communication and acquire some interpersonal communication skills.

  • Teaching Online in Plain Language: Creating Clear Research Guides, Library Websites, and Online Instruction
    • Contributers: Jason Puckett, Jason Puckett
    • Description: “Plain language” is a term from the legal field: federal law requires that government agencies are required to use clear communication that the public can understand and use. As online teachers, we can take advantage of the set of clear guidelines and best practices that has grown up around this requirement. The federal plain language guidelines are fully in line with web usability recommendations, and can help streamline and clarify our online teaching. Whether you’re writing for a library website, a tutorial, a research guide or some other format, you’ll learn how to make your materials more accessible to the widest possible audience without dumbing them down.

  • Testing for Accessibility: Free Tools to Assess the Accessibility of Online Resources
    • Contributers: Annie Peterson, Annie Peterson, Hannah Rosen, Hannah Rosen
    • Description: Accessibility in online resources, a.k.a. the ability for users with disabilities and/or learning impairments to access content, is important to libraries, archives, museums, and other types of cultural heritage institutions: but how do you test an online resource to see if it is accessible? How do you ensure that the material you purchase and/or the material you create conforms to accessibility standards and best practices? This class will review several freely available tools that can help you test a website’s adherence to accessibility standards. The tools can help you test content you are considering for your institution, or resources that you already provide but want to improve either internally or through advocating for improved accessibility. We will also review common standards and best practices that are used to evaluate online content.

  • The Art of Collections Management Technology
    • Contributers: Megan Forbes, Nik Honeysett
    • Description: In an effort to better support and serve museums, LYRASIS has commissioned a field-wide analysis and evaluation of collections management technology. This case study presentation will focus on the information gathered that will be generally useful for those working for change in their own institutions.

  • The Evolution of the Finding Aid: From Document to Data
    • Contributers: Christine Kim, Valerie Addonizio
    • Description: Do you find the data model of ArchivesSpace different than how you’re used to thinking of finding aids, and you can’t quite put your finger on why? Have you heard words like “normalized” and “atomized” and wondered how and why they apply to archival data? Do concepts built into ArchivesSpace, like archival objects and top containers, seem a bit too unfamiliar to build confidence in your understanding of them? These are some of the areas that are explored as we trace the evolution of the finding aid from a static, singular document into a collection of linked data points. In this webinar, Valerie Addonizio explains the ways that description, both legacy and new, has evolved, especially as it relates to the way information is stored and displayed in ArchivesSpace. A particular focus is placed on the concepts underlying some of the less intuitive features of ArchivesSpace, such as archival objects and container modeling.

  • The University of Michigan Ebook Collection: An investment in open source, community accountable infrastructure
    • Contributers: Sharla Lair, Lisa Larson
    • Description: LYRASIS is hosting a webinar to provide our members an opportunity to learn more about the University of Michigan Ebook Collection, a comprehensive collection of the University of Michigan Press’s scholarly ebooks for sale to libraries. The collection is fully accessible on Fulcrum, a leading community-developed, open source platform for digital scholarship developed with support from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. Fulcrum offers users the ability to read books with associated digital enhancements, such as: 3-D models, embedded audio, video, and databases; zoomable online images, and interactive media. Please join us to learn how your investment in this newly available content supports the sustainability of open source, community accountable infrastructure.

  • Towards an Open and Equitable Future
    • Contributers: Heather Joseph, Heather Joseph
    • Description: LYRASIS Member Summit 2019 keynote speaker Heather Joseph, Executive Director, SPARC.

  • Transforming XLS to EAD: Importing Component Hierarchies
    • Contributers: Christine Kim, Elizabeth Perkes, Jason Ronallo, Bobbi Fox, Kelli Spring
    • Description: Do you list out your components on a spreadsheet before committing the item records into ArchivesSpace? If this is your preferred processing workflow, you’re not alone. In this webinar, we looked at three distinct methods to get your spreadsheet rows and columns into your ArchivesSpace resource record to populate components. Elizabeth Perkes (Utah State Archives) demonstrates a workflow that uses built-in Microsoft Office tools to convert Microsoft Excel spreadsheets to EAD via mail merge. Jason Ronallo (North Carolina State University) provides a demo of the Stead schema and Steady tool he developed, which is a command line tool and web application that uses Ruby to transform data in spreadsheets into EAD component levels. And Ben Johnson (Harvard Business School) uses a spreadsheet importer plugin developed by Bobbi Fox (Harvard University) in a variety of ways. However, he provides an overview of one simple use of the tool: How to easily and quickly add bulk data from new accessions to existing resources. Ben walks through his workflow for that and show some limitations and pitfalls to avoid. But perhaps you would like to see more than just workflows. Kelly Spring (East Carolina University) provides insight into some of the common troubleshooting and other tasks that will help you successfully upload the EAD to ArchivesSpace.

  • Understanding Cybersecurity for Performing Arts Organizations
    • Contributers: Blake Carver
    • Description: Performing Arts Organizations are at risk of losing funding, audiences, and information due to cybersecurity vulnerabilities. We all know we should use good passwords, keep software updated, and follow other basic precautions online; however, understanding the reasons behind these rules is critical to help us convince ourselves and others that the extra work is indeed worth it. This session will cover securing your data, network, website, and computers. It will address security myths, passwords, tracking, malware, and will cover a range of tools and techniques, making this session ideal for small to mid-sized organizations.

  • Varying Approaches to Testing ArchivesSpace Pre-Releases
    • Contributers: ArchivesSpaceHome, Alex Duryee, Miloche Kottman
    • Description: Before we make any release or update widely available, we perform tests in every nook and cranny in ArchivesSpace. Testing applications plays an essential role in our workflow to ensure the application is growing in the right direction, and not breaking already functional working.

  • Web Archiving: An Introduction to Basic Concepts and Tools
    • Contributers: Annie Peterson, Hannah Rosen
    • Description: This session will provide an overview of basic concepts and definitions in web archiving, and then will demonstrate some tools that can be used in web archiving. Instructors will cover the basics of what the WARC (Web ARChive) format is and how it can be created and viewed, as well as other important concepts and terms in web archiving. Instructors will also demonstrate tools and discuss how they can be incorporated into a larger web archiving strategy at cultural heritage institutions. Tools covered will include WebRecorder, the Wayback machine, and WARCreate. Most tools demonstrated in the class will be freely available so they can be used after the class at no further cost to the institutions, but the class will also include discussion of paid alternatives for archiving web content.

  • Webinar: ArchivesSpace PUI Overview and Implementation Strategies
    • Contributers: ArchivesSpaceHome, Mark Custer, Susan Pysynski, Annie Benefiel, Leigh Rupinski
    • Description: Mark Custer (Yale University) and Susan Pyzynski (Harvard University) were deeply entrenched in the public interface as they led the community effort of the ArchivesSpace Public User Interface Enhancement Working Group to shape this essential access point for archival collections. Now they have moved onto their next great challenge — implementing the PUI at their own institutions. Mark and Susan each share the strategies they have created to roll out the new PUI. Both institutions aim to be using the new PUI by early next year. Grand Valley State University has been using the ArchivesSpace PUI since 2014 and have already rolled out the new public interface. Annie Benefiel and Leigh Rupinski share valuable insight on how the PUI has affected their day-to-day responsibilities of providing access to finding aids, as well as public reception and adapting their instruction for students and researchers.

  • Welcome to the LYRASIS Community: An introduction to Leaders Circle Member Benefits
    • Contributers: Jennifer Bielewski, Jennifer Bielewski
    • Description: The June 2019 merger with DuraSpace was completed as of July 1, 2019. Welcome our new DuraSpace members to the LYRASIS community. Together, we will deepen the LYRASIS commitment to be a leader, as well as active participant in the open source technologies conversations, expansion and future direction. In this session, we will review the benefits of membership and review the access of services, products, events, as well as other exclusive and unique benefits that impact the your institution in all areas of service to your own communities.

  • What is next for FADGI and Still Image Digitization?
    • Contributers: Jennifer Bielewski, Jim Studnicki, Don Williams
    • Description: Session 5 concludes the Webinar Series with Don Williams giving an overview of the new (2015) FADGI Draft Guidelines, and a look ahead to future metrics. Jim Studnicki will show an example of using the FADGI metrics while photographing 3D objects, and end the session with some lessons learned while implementing the guidelines on real cultural heritage digitization projects.